The Sound of Silence

“Let us be silent, that we may hear the whispers of the gods”

The Lower Mill Pond. Easthampton, MA. Photo by Bruce Barone.
~With Thanks to PGT

In silence, what do you see? Hear?
I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You!

Art Education

I bought this magazine in an antiques store one year ago and was thinking about it today:

In our Art History class, we read:

“Eugene Ashton and Ella Perry publish the Perry Magazine for School and Home through 1906. The Perry Magazine was a marketing and communications vehicle from a company involved in schoolroom decoration and the picture study movement at the end of the nineteenth century. The magazine promoted the use of small, inexpensive, reproductions of fine art and contemporary photographs in lessons. Many of the articles in the Perry Magazine contained lessons about moral and ethical issues as well as art history and art appreciation. The content of the Perry Magazine was determined by the economic, social, and political issues of the day. Eugene and Ella met as school principals in Provincetown, Massachusetts. The story of their marriage and business is one of success as capitalist ventures. Having been teachers they understood what teachers needed. The Perry Magazine had a large influence on the introduction of art appreciation and art reproductions into the public school curriculum. Before the publication of the Perry Magazine only the elite had access to fine art.”

At the MET. Photo by Bruce Barone.

Do you study art?
I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You!

Turkey Roulade

One week before Thanksgiving I saw Ina Garten prepare this on TV. And I said, “That’s what I will make this year!”

It was delicious.

 Ingredients

nocoupons

  • 3/4 cup large-diced dried figs, stems removed
  • 3/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup Calvados or brandy
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 cups diced onions (2 onions)
  • 1 cup (1/2-inch-diced) celery (3 stalks)
  • 3/4 pound pork sausage, casings removed (sweet and hot mixed) (I used only sweet)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary leaves
  • 3 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
  • 3 cups herb-seasoned stuffing mix (recommended: Pepperidge Farm)
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock, preferably homemade
  • 1 extra-large egg, beaten
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 whole (2 halves) turkey breast, boned and butterflied (5 pounds)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Directions

1. Place the dried figs and cranberries in a small saucepan and pour in the Calvados and 1/2 cup water. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, then lower the heat and simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and celery and saute until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the sausage, crumbling it into small bits with a fork, and saute, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes, until cooked and browned. Add the figs and cranberries with the liquid, the chopped rosemary, and pine nuts, and cook for 2 more minutes. Scrape up the brown bits with a wooden spoon.

3. Place the stuffing mix in a large bowl. Add the sausage mixture, chicken stock, egg, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper and stir well. (The stuffing may be prepared ahead and stored in the refrigerator overnight.) (This is what I did.)

4. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Place a baking rack on a sheet pan.

5. Lay the butterflied turkey breast skin side down on a cutting board. Sprinkle the meat with 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Spread the stuffing in a 1/2-inch-thick layer over the meat, leaving a half-inch border on all sides. Don’t mound the stuffing or the turkey will be difficult to roll. (Place the leftover stuffing in a buttered gratin dish and bake for the last 45 minutes of roasting alongside the turkey.)

6. Starting at 1 end, roll the turkey like a jelly roll and tuck in any stuffing that tries to escape on the sides. Tie the roast firmly with kitchen twine every 2 inches to make a compact cylinder.

7. Place the stuffed turkey breast seam side down on the rack on the sheet pan. Brush with the melted butter, sprinkle generously with salt and pepper, and roast for 1 3/4 to 2 hours, until an instant-read thermometer registers 150 degrees F in the center. (I test in a few places.) Cover the turkey with aluminum foil and allow it to rest at room temperature for 15 minutes. Carve 1/2-inch-thick slices and serve warm with the extra stuffing.

Note: I used a roasting pan. After one hour I felt that the turkey roulade was not browning sufficiently, so I raised the oven temperature to 400. Total cooking time was 2 hours and the turkey roulade was moist and very flavorful.

Here’s my plate:

I also made butternut squash (not pictured; flavored with maple syrup), garlic mashed potatoes, and Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Sun-dried tomatoes (These I trimmed, cut in half, seasoned with Kosher salt and pepper and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and roasted in oven for about 30 minutes, turning once and adding the sun-dried tomatoes the last five minutes. Susan made the cranberry sauce, to which she adds mango.

Do you have a favorite turkey recipe?
I would love to hear from you!


If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life,
please contact me. Thank You!

Choosing Beauty

Tulips on the Kitchen Table. Photo by Bruce Barone.

Do you choose beauty? Do you find the miracles in everyday life?
I would love to hear from you!


If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You!

Hoboken, New Jersey

Some images from my upcoming book, Famous People Famous Places. Introduction by Luc Sante. He writes:

“Hoboken, a mile-square patch on the waterfront in Hudson County, New Jersey, was once a brawling German sailors’ town, and back then it retained a bit of that atmosphere, mostly in its bars. It also hosted the memory of Frank Sinatra–embalmed there even when he was still alive–as well as whole clans of Appalachian migrants, a class of people you didn’t often see elsewhere in the metropolitan area. Hoboken could remind you of On the Waterfront, parts of which were filmed there, or it could remind you of Walker Evans photographs, of industrial Pennsylvania or blighted Alabama depending on the particular block. Until developers happened upon it, Hoboken was a tranquil place, as homey as a dirt yard and as concentrated as a sitcom setting, with its main drag lined with mysterious storefronts full of oddities, open whenever the proprietors woke up during daylight hours, and its town hall surrounded by benches where slumbered the ancients, the city’s collective memory.

            “Barone’s photographs catch the distinctive silence of the era, its somnolence, its vague menace–unspecified, sometimes, even after it had kicked you in the head and taken the six bucks in your pocket–and its weather.”

Are They Not All Self Portraits

Would you like a copy of my book? I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You!

My Name Is Bruce and I Will Be Your Cook

Can I interest you in some Tamago-Yaki? Or Shrimp Roll?

Self Portrait. Thanksgiving Morning. November 25, 2010.

Here. You choose. And please help yourself to Soy Sauce:

Thanksgiving Breakfast for my children.

Maybe you prefer Shrimp Sushi? Careful,  I added a lot of Wasabi to it!

YUM!!!  

Let’s go for a walk and when we return home we will all share a lovely Thanksgiving Dinner:

Thanksgiving Dinner. November 25, 2010.

I hope you enjoyed your food!

Would you like to come over again to Bruce’s Kitchen? I would love to hear from you!


If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You!

Happy Thanksgiving

I share with you this; an excerpt of a speech I delivered to 300+ people from the magazine industry a few years ago at a Holiday Luncheon in New York City (It’s in caps because I found it easier to read when at the podium):

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON IS AN AWESOME TIME OF YEAR…
A TIME FOR LOOKING FOR THE BEST IN OTHERS…
A TIME FOR JOY IN BRIGHTENING OTHER LIVES WITH GENEROUS GIFTS.
TWO YEARS AGO I SHARED WITH YOU SOME COMMENTS FROM CHILDREN
ABOUT WHAT THEY LEARNED IN LIFE. AND THIS YEAR,
WHAT I LIKE MOST ABOUT THE HOLIDAY SEASON,
IS SEEING THE HOLIDAYS THROUGH THE EYES OF CHILDREN,
FOR AS WE GET OLDER
WE SOMETIMES GROW NUMB TO THE JOY.
THIS YEAR, I AM REMINDED EVEN MORE THAN EVER
THAT THE HOLIDAY SEASON IS ABOUT MUSIC, LIFE, AND LOVE.
AND IN KEEPING WITH THE TRADITION STARTED THEN TWO YEARS AGO
I AM TODAY REMINDED WHAT CHILDREN RECENTLY SAID
WHEN ASKED THEIR FEELINGS ABOUT LOVE.
ONE CHILD, AGE 6, SAID
“I’M IN FAVOR OF LOVE AS LONG
AS IT DOESN’T HAPPEN WHEN THE SIMPSONS IS ON TV.”
ANOTHER, AGE 7, SAID
‘IF FALLING IN LOVE IS ANYTHING LIKE LEARNING HOW TO SPELL,
I DON’T WANT TO DO IT.”
AND FINALLY, ONE CHILD SAID
“I THINK YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO GET SHOT WITH AN ARROW OR SOMETHING
BUT THE REST OF IT ISN’T SUPPOSED TO BE SO PAINFUL.”
LOOKING OUT AT YOU NOW I AM LASTLY REMINDED
HOW THERE ARE TIMES IN OUR LIVES AS FRIENDS
WHEN NOTHING MATTERS BUT CELEBRATION….
I HOPE TODAY IS SUCH A DAY FOR YOU
AND I WANT TO LEAVE YOU WITH ONE FINAL THOUGHT;
IT IS, I BELIEVE,
VERY IMPORTANT TO STOP AND EMBRACE
THE SPECIAL EVENTS THAT MARK OUR LIVES…
NOT THE SECONDS, MINUTES, HOURS..
BUT THE OCCASIONS, BOTH SMALL AND LARGE,
OF GREAT REJOICING…THE SMILE OF A CHILD,
A TEENAGER’S LAUGHTER,
SNOWMEN MADE FROM MARSHMALLOWS,
THE MORNING SKY, MIGRATING GEESE,
A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS,
THE MOVIE IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE,
SNOWBALL FIGHTS, A BABY CRYING,
SNOW PILED HIGH, GINGERBREAD HOUSES,
RED RIBBONS AND RED FACES,
SEEING THE TREE IN ROCKEFELLER CENTER,
AGAIN, WATCHING A LOVED ONE SLEEPING,
CHILDREN GIGGLING,
SO MANY TREASURES TO REMEMBER AND TO DISCOVER,
TO GIVE THANKS FOR, LIKE LIFE, LIKE LOVE,
LIKE YOU, HERE WITH US TODAY.
THE GERMAN POET GOETHE SAID
“NOTHING IS WORTH MORE THAN THIS DAY.”
ISN’T THAT THE TRUTH !

Sunrise Over Mt. Tom. Easthampton, MA. Photo by Bruce Barone.

Isn’t that the truth? I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You!

Our Thanksgiving Menu

Breakfast
Flax Seed Bread
Fruit Salad
Tamago-Yaki
Shrimp Sushi
Champagne
Coffee
 Dinner
Roasted Turkey Roulade
With Fig, Cranberry, Sausage Stuffing
Mashed Potatoes
Butternut Squash
Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Sun-dried Tomatoes
Homemade Cranberry Sauce
Mushroom Gravy
Wine
Assorted Pies
Coffee
May Peace and Love Be With You!
Photo by Bruce Barone.
Cheers!

What’s on your Thanksgiving Menu? I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You!  

When It Snows In New England

We have not yet seen snow fall here this Autumn in Western Massachusetts. Black Friday might bring rain mixed with snow and if so you will find me at the park photographing the field and the stone bridge.

Meanwhile, today I am thinking of when it snowed a few years ago a few days before Thanksgiving:

The Lower Mill Pond. Easthampton, MA. Photo by Bruce Barone.

What are your plans for Thanksgiving? I would love to hear from you!

If you want distinctive nature, documentary or portrait photography–photography with soul that inspires you to live a more artful and beautiful life, please contact me. Thank You! 

Tamago-Yaki

My son and daughter love this!

And I make it every Thanksgiving morning for them.

Very popular at breakfast or in Japanese boxed lunches called obento, this omelette has a delicate sweet flavor and a pretty layered look when sliced. You may have tried it already at sushi shops, where a thin slab of rolled omelette is seved atop vinegared rice, wrapped in a strip of nori seaweed. This recipe can be adapted so that it contains more or less sugar, and dashi broth may also be added, depending on your preferences. For a colorful variation, try adding chopped parsley to the beaten eggs before frying. Made without sugar it is delicious in sandwiches and rolled sushi.
6 eggs
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons sake or mirin
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
Beat the eggs well and blend in the sugar, soy sauce, and sake. Heat oil in a large skillet. Over low heat, add 1/6 of the egg mixture and let it spread evenly over the bottom of the skillet. As the egg becomes half-done, roll it from one edge of the skillet tot he other and let it rest on one side of the skillet. Pour a similar amount of the egg mixture into the skillet, making sure it spreads underneath the resting omelette roll. When this new layer becomes half-done, fold the first omelette roll inside, rolling from edge to edge. Repeat with another 1/6 of the egg mixture until you have a fairly think omelette roll. Slice into thick sections and serve.
Note: It is best to use a square skillet. I like a little bit more soy sauce in the mixture.
Have you ever eaten Tamago-Yaki? I would love to hear from you!